Danish aid organisation withdraws in wake of killings

Danish Refugee Council has undertaken security measures following the tragic deaths

A Danish aid organisation, the Danish Refugee Council, has decided to stop its activities in the region of Yei in South Sudan where two of its employees were shot and killed this week.

The two aid workers were locals and were employed by the organisation’s mine and bomb clearing division, Danish Demining Group (DDG).

“What happened is tragic,” said Christian Jacob Hansen, the divisional head of the Danish Refugee Council, told Metroxpress newspaper.

“We’ve stopped our activities in the area where it took place. We’ve done so in order to get to the bottom of the specific circumstances of the situation.”

READ MORE: Two Danish aid organisation members killed in South Sudan

Taking security measures
It’s not immediately clear what the motive for the attack was, but the Danish Refugee Council had initially evaluated that the vehicle the victims were driving was not attacked because it was carrying aid workers.

Hansen said that the organisation has undertaken some security measures in order to ascertain whether the area is safe and which adjustments need to be made.

The Danish Refugee Council has been operating in the area that is now South Sudan since 2005. DDG followed suit in 2006. Over 50 aid workers have been killed in South Sudan since the civil war broke out about two years ago.





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