Denmark top EU energy tech exporters

But the sector saw a 4 percent decrease compared to last year

Despite a small decline in energy tech export, Danish companies topped Europe in 2015 when it came to exporting energy technology, according to a report composed jointly by the Energy and Climate Ministry, and the two industry and energy advocacy organisations Dansk Industri and Dansk Energi.

Denmark exported 71.4 billion kroner worth of energy tech last year, a 4 percent decrease compared to the year before, the report found. Energy tech accounts for 11 percent of the total Danish export.

“Despite a small decline, I’m pleased that Denmark has maintained its clear leading position in the EU regarding the export of energy technology,” said the energy and climate minister, Lars Christian Lilleholt.

“The export figures remind us that we can’t rest on our laurels and I will establish a dialogue with the industry and energy industry to discuss how we together can strengthen the export options to the benefit of the climate, growth and Danish jobs.”

READ MORE: DI Energy optimistic about COP21: Denmark stands to earn billions

Sehr gut in Germany
Last year, energy tech export increased to markets in Germany, the US and China. Germany is the largest Danish export market by far, accounting for 24.7 billion kroner. Meanwhile, export to markets in Sweden and the UK saw a decrease.

Denmark’s export of energy tech has exploded in recent years. In 2000, Denmark exported energy tech for 26.7 billion kroner and has since enjoyed a 6.8 percent in average annual growth.

During the same period, the average annual growth of the total Danish export was at 3.0 percent.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.