Students scoop seven awards at science fair

Students from Skt Josef’s School in Roskilde last month triumphed in Denmark’s largest talent competition in science and technology, Unge Forskere, winning seven awards in the junior category.

The young scientists competed against 100 innovative projects shortlisted for the 2016 Unge Forskere finals, which took place at Forum.

Handshake with prince
A total of 2,188 projects from public schools all over Denmark were registered for the science fair this year, and over 9,000 visitors came to Forum to support the finalists and see their projects.

At the end, the patron of the competition, Prince Joachim, and the education minister, Christine Antorini, awarded prizes worth a total 250,000 kroner to all the winners.

Fantastic experience
“It was a fantastic experience for the whole school,” Tine Gregory, the international communications manager at Skt Josef’s School, told the Copenhagen Post Weekly.

“And it was also great for the integration of our international students.”

Internationals shine
Three of Skt Josef’s finalists came from the school’s international department, which was established in 2012 and recently celebrated its 100th student.

Although they haven’t been with the school for a very long time, two of the three international finalists won first and third prize in their categories and received 15,000 and 10,000 kroner each.

Highly innovative
The Skt Josef’s students’ projects covered a wide range of innovative solutions, including an innovative asthma treatment, a smartphone climate cover, wireless energy transmission via laser, and energy made from fibre.

On top of the students’ achievements, the school’s science teacher Ole Grevald received the ‘Teacher of the Year’ award in the public school age category.





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