Danish families choosing private maternity clinics over hospitals

Prospective parents choosing more luxury and more personal care

The numbers of prospective parents in Denmark choosing to use private midwives and maternity hospitals has been steadily rising in recent years.

The country’s only private clinics are all located in Zealand in Slagelse, Roskilde and Holbaek. In 2014, 80 pregnant women opted to deliver their babies away from the public system. In 2015, the number rose to 111, and already in 2016, 115 women have opted for private clinics.

“I am surprised that the number of people choosing us has risen so strongly,” Louise Zielinski, the owner of the Storkereden private clinic, told TV2.

Feel like a number
Zielinski said that having a baby at a public hospital is a fine option, but that clinics like hers offer “something extra”.

“Parents tell us that they ‘feel like a number’ at hospitals,” said Zielinski. “At the same time, they enjoy things like the luxury of having a midwife with them all of the time.”

Those living in Zealand can go either the public or private route. Those from outside of the region pay a premium of 25,000 kroner that entitles them to seven antenatal consultations, the birth and follow-up maternity visits.

More clinics on the way
Zielinski said that she is opening a clinic in Copenhagen this summer and is also looking towards opening clinics in Jutland and on Funen.

“It is perfectly possible to create a place that is both good for midwives and for future parents,” she said.

Zielinski receives 19,000 kroner from Region Zealand when a mother chooses to give birth at one of her clinics.





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