Good colleagues most important for working Danes

Good bosses and high wages have less meaning

When it comes to being happy at work, the majority of Danes point to having good colleagues as the most critical factor, according to a new survey.

The survey, composed by the union HK, showed that 54 percent of working Danes believe that good colleagues was an important factor. Some 46 percent said that their work tasks were among the most important factors, while a good boss (30 percent) and a high wage (15 percent) also figured in.

“Having good colleagues means you are part of a fellowship in which you support one another socially and professionally,” said Signe Pihl-Thingvad, a professor of psychology in the work environment at the University of Southern Denmark.

“Colleagues are important for us to thrive, but also for us to dare to be innovative in order to solve our work tasks better and smarter. So it’s essential for employers to focus more on supporting the fellowship on a daily basis and create a framework that promotes it.”

READ MORE: Danish capital in 2016: Cost of not working too high

Going the extra mile
The survey revealed that 63 percent of Danes were more inclined to happily go to work in the mornings when they had a good rapport with their colleagues.

It’s also an important component when deciding whether to remain at their current job. Some 35 percent said they would stay at a job they otherwise wouldn’t like, as long as they liked their colleagues.

Additionally, 74 percent of Danes said they would go the extra mile to help a colleague, while 62 percent feel that their colleagues would do the same for them.





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