Danish women charged more for personal care products than men

Danish Women’s Society accuses retailers of unjust treatment

When shopping for personal care products such as shaving foam, razors and deodorants, Danish women have to splash out more than men, reports Metroxpress.

A price comparison of 15 similar products sold in a number of Danish retail chains and online shops has revealed that women often have to pay more than men for comparable products with near identical ingredients.

Sara Ferreira from the Danish Women’s Society finds the situation “simply not cool” and says women should not be charged more just because they are women, especially since they earn less than men to start with.

READ MORE: Denmark gives millions to amplify women’s rights

More complex
Martin Solomon, the chief economist at the Danish Consumer Council, and Rasmus Langhoffnoted, the equality spokesman for Socialdemokraterne, both agree that “women can rightly feel cheated” and should not have to pay more than men for the same products.

Meanwhile, retailers argue that personal care products for women are more “complex” and cannot be compared to the same products for men.

It is like comparing organic whole milk and conventional low-fat milk,” Torben Mouritzen, the CEO of  Normal, told Metroxpress.





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