Windy city blowing hot for Danish water tech

Chicago delegation inspired by solutions in Denmark

Waste water companies in Denmark are experiencing a spike in interest from the US water industry. Now, the huge metropolis of Chicago has got in on the action.

Chi-Town recently sent a delegation to Denmark to gain some inspiration from Danish water tech solutions. The delegation was led by Flemming Bomholt Møller the head of the Water Technology Alliance at the Consulate General of Denmark in Chicago.

“In Denmark we have the required knowledge and expertise to assist the American water industry to transition to more efficient solutions,” said Møller.

“Since 2006, exports of water technology to the US has almost doubled and that affirms that there is considerable demand for our expertise.”

READ MORE: Chinese investors sign deal with Danish water tech companies

My kind of tech
During their visit to Denmark, the Chicago delegation visited waste water facilities at Marselisborg, Egå and Åby to witness how Denmark has handled some of the water challenges currently being faced in the US.

At Marselisborg, for instance, the facility has managed to become 140 percent energy neutral – meaning it produces more energy that it consumes while cleansing water.

According to the Foreign Ministry, a number of the Chicago delegates have already decided to invest in Danish water tech solutions.





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