They’ve chosen Brexit, but can they save their bacon?

Stricken Brits may have to switch to streaky for their sarnies

Most of Denmark’s major business were shocked by Britain’s vote to leave the EU on Friday, but one company has remained remarkably calm.

As the British pound continued to fall, Denmark’s largest pork producer, Danish Crown, has indicated it will compensate by cranking up the prices of bacon in the UK.

If the Brits still want to eat bacon, they will have to pay the price, according to Søren Tinggaard, the deputy head of Danish Crown’s export department.

“It’s to our advantage that the UK’s pork industry is not self-sufficient for bacon production,” he told Berlingske Business.

“They have to rely on importing our products, if they want to maintain the current level of bacon consumption. The way we see it, Brits will be eating bacon tomorrow and the day after tomorrow as well.”

Switching to streaky
He said that if the UK, Danish Crown’s largest market, can’t pay the higher price on bacon, they will sell their products to buyers in Japan, Australia or in Scandinavia who can.

Danish pork exporters produce back bacon, referred to as ‘English bacon’ in Denmark, almost exclusively for the Brits, as Danes only eat streaky bacon themselves.

That may change if the British can’t pay the high prices for the Danish back bacon and have to switch to the cheaper streaky bacon for their bacon sandwiches.





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