Five sentenced to prison in Denmark’s largest case of human trafficking

All of them will be expelled from the country

Four men and one woman have today been sentenced to prison and a large million kroner fine at the district court in Glostrup for a gross exploitation of Romanian citizens in what has been described as Denmark’s biggest case of human trafficking.

A 47-year-old Syrian man has been sentenced to 7 years in prison and a 19.7 million kroner fine for human trafficking and systematic financial fraud in a number of small companies.

A 27-year-old Rumanian man has been sentenced to 5 years in prison, while the other three defendants got 4 and half years, 4 years and 3 years in prison.

All of them will be expelled from Denmark, reported TV2.

READ MORE: Lured to Denmark and exploited as sex slaves and thieves

Promise of better life
This is the third case of the so-called ‘Operation Wasp’s Nest’ that was launched in February 2015, when the Danish police uncovered a large criminal network responsible for luring some 300 Romanians to Denmark and using their identities to commit financial crimes.

The court process has lasted for over 50 days and a total of 79 witnesses have been questioned.

Some 18 Romanians fell victim to human trafficking in this case.





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