Rainy weather affecting sales at Danish campsites and water parks

Overcast conditions with chance of rain will continue to prevail for the next few days

Danish campsites, outdoor summer parks and retailers located at holiday resorts are losing profits due to cloudy and rainy weather.

“When the weather is bad, people drink less, make less barbecue and eat less ice-cream,” Claus Bøgelund Nielsen, the vice president of De Samvirkende Købmænd (the Danish federation of shopkeepers), told DR.

Nielsen pointed out that shops located near summer resorts depend on the money they earn during the summer months for the rest of the year.

READ MORE: Danes escaping rainy weather to sunny Mallorca

Fewer go camping
Campsites and summer outdoor parks have also noticed significant decline in visitors in the past two weeks, after they experienced a successful start to the season in June.

“Those who look out of the window and watch the weather forecast are not going to go camping in this weather,” Anne-Vibeke Isaksen, the communications manager at the Danish Camping Union, told DR.

“When it rains one day, it’s not bad, but when it has been raining for two weeks like now, it influences people’s behaviour.”

Søren Kragelund, the executive manager at Fårup Sommerland in north Jutland, confirms that especially people with season tickets do not come to the water park when it rains.

Meanwhile, the overcast conditions with temperatures between 15 and 20 degrees and chance of rain will continue to prevail for the next few days, according to the Danish meteorological institute.

 





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