Danish dad stops a bike thief – and gets fined by police

Cops understand the reasoning but question the methodology

A 50-year-old Danish father from the Jutland town of Skive caught a man in the process of stealing his son’s bicycle and used his car to ‘detain’ the thief.

“He caught up with the thief and told him he was going to run him over,” Christian Toftemark from Skive Police told TV Midtvest. “The thief wound up with a broken nose and multiple abrasions.”

READ MORE: Police admit to not pursuing bicycle thefts

Expensive honesty
The father told police exactly how he bagged the crook and earned himself a fine in the process.

“You can’t run over people,” said Toftemark. “Even if they steal your bike. The father has been charged with driving violations and the thief has been fined for stealing the bike.”





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