Rio 2016 rundown: Today’s Olympic action (Day 11)

With a bit of luck, Denmark could reach its ten-medal target today

The medals are coming in daily now for the Danes, although there is a distinct lack of the golden variety – Denmark only has one out of eight so far.

But today is a new day and the Danes have several opportunities to add to their current medal foray. Kristinna Pedersen and Kamilla Rytter Juhl will be guaranteed at least a silver if they win their semi-final in the women’s badminton doubles, and Rene Holten Poulsen hopes to put his illness behind him and go for the gold in the Kayak 1,000m singles sprint.

But the medal potential doesn’t stop there. In sailing, Anne-Marie Rindom currently sits second ahead of the medal race in the women’s laser radial, while Amalie Dideriksen is fourth overall in the women’s omnium before the final three races.

Today’s medal events include:

14:50 – Athletics: men’s triple jump final

16:20 – Athletics: women’s discuss final

00:30 –Table tennis: women’s team final

01:30 – Athletics: men’s high jump final

03:30 – Athletics: women’s 1,500m final

03:45 – Athletics: men’s 400m hurdles final

Flag_of_Denmark.svgToday’s Dane-watch sees action in:

14:55: Badminton – Kristinna Pedersen and Kamilla Rytter Juhl in the semi-finals of the women’s doubles on DR1

15:02: Kayak – Rene Holten Poulsen in the men’s 1,000m singles on TV2

15:57: Cycling – Amalie Dideriksen in the time trial in the women’s omnium on TV2

18:05: Sailing – Anne-Marie Rindom in the women’s radial laser medal race, Jonas Warrer and Christian Peter Lübeck in the men’s 49er and Jena Mai Hansen and Katja Salskov-Iversen in the women’s 49er FX. All shown on TV2 Charlie

21:10 + 22:05 Cycling – Amalie Dideriksen in the flying lap and the points race in the women’s omnium on TV2

02:10: Athletics – Sarah Slott Petersen and Stina Troest in the semi-finals of the women’s 400m hurdles





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