Out and About: Bonnets, books and all things bounciness

Summer lingered a little longer for the annual fete organised by St Alban’s Church. It was a bustling scene in Churchillparken; the grassy area outside the church was ringed by brilliant white tents selling a wide assortment of treats and handicrafts.

Colourful flags fluttered along the edges of the tents as children took gleeful leaps on the bouncy castle and participated in games. Meanwhile, the adults were well occupied by the brimming book and food stalls.

Food was accompanied by entertainment. Jazz music floated through the air, mingling with sounds of conversation and laughter. Later on guests watched with interest, phones and cameras ready, as the Jane Austen dancers performed.

Amongst the organisers spotted at the event were Kath Wattam, Angela Hansen, Jean Donner, Rosemary Bohr and Jenny Madsen. From the smiles on their and the guests’ faces, it is easy to say that the event was a success.





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