Grøndal MultiCenter serving up inaugural Copenhagen Open in padel tennis

Hispanic favourite gaining momentum in Denmark

This coming weekend (September 10-11), the sports and athletics centre Grøndal MultiCenter will host the very first Copenhagen Open in padel tennis.

The medal matches will take place on Sunday, and Carl Christian Ebbesen, the deputy mayor for culture and leisure, will be at hand to present the Gold-medal match.

First invented in Acapulco, Mexico back in 1969, padel tennis remains a primarily Hispanic sport popular in nations such as Argentina, Mexico and Spain, but it is quickly spreading across Europe.

The sport is also growing in the US, where it is popular among tennis players looking to keep fit during the winter.

READ MORE: Danish government allocates millions for research in culture and sport

Tennis with a hint of squash
Padel tennis is usually played as doubles on an enclosed court about one third the size of a standard tennis court, while the scoring is the same as tennis and the balls are the same as well, although there is less pressure in them than normal tennis.

Similar to squash, balls can be played off the court walls and the racquets are solid and stringless.

Whether you want to participate or just take in the action as a spectator, check out copenhagenpadel.dk for online registration and further information, or read more here (in English).

The deadline for participation registration is Wednesday. Grøndal MultiCenter is located in Nordvest, the northwestern district of Copenhagen.





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