More Brits wanting Danish citizenship in wake of Brexit

Over a hundred have applied since June 23

Since the British people voted to bid farewell to the EU on June 23, Denmark has seen a spike in Brits keen on getting their hands on Danish citizenship.

Between June 24 and August 31, some 108 British citizens applied for citizenship, according to figures from the Ministry of Immigration, Integration and Housing.

“It makes sense for them to apply for citizenship in Denmark. Their EU membership status is the reason for them being able to stay here,” Rebecca Adler-Nissen, a professor at the University of Copenhagen, said according to Metroxpress newspaper.

“The EU membership impacts their possibility of settling down in the EU and getting a job. There are over 1 million Brits living and working in other EU nations who have the same rights as other EU citizens in those countries.”

READ MORE: Number of Brits seeking Danish and Swedish citizenship has risen since Brexit

Better passport conditions
Over the course of the first week following the Brexit vote, a total of 42 applications trickled in.

During the same 68-day period in 2014, just 27 Brits applied for Danish citizenship, and during the same period in 2015 there were 76 applications.

As of 1 September 2015 it also became possible to have dual citizenship in Denmark, allowing Brits to become Danish citizens without having to give up their British passports.





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