Activists arrested after breaking into coal plant in Aalborg

Police quickly unchain group from conveyor belts to limit disruption

The Danish climate change-fighting activist group KlimaKollektivet broke into the Nordjyllandsværket coal power station in Aalborg on Saturday morning to protest against the country’s continued use of fossil fuels.

Nine members had anticipated being there a while and brought sleeping bags, but they were arrested shortly afterwards, according to North Jutland Police.

Quickly removed
Carrying banners sporting slogans such as ‘Luk Værket’ (Close the plant) and ‘Nul Kul’ (No coal), the activists scaled a fence and then locked themselves to some of the power plant’s conveyor belts.

They then issued a set of demands to Aalborg Municipality, promising they would prevent the plant from operating until they had received assurances it would be shut down and coal would no longer be used.

The police turned up at 9:19 am, and within an hour they had freed all the activists and taken them back to the station to formally charge them with disturbing the peace and trespassing.

Climate cannot wait
Tannie Nyboe, a spokesperson for the group, told Nordjyske that KlimaKollektivet targeted Nordjyllandsværket for three main reasons: it is unlikely to close down anytime soon, it is owned by a municipality with green aspirations, and “the climate simply cannot wait” for the country to go 100 percent green.

KlimaKollektivet is primarily based in Copenhagen, according to Nyboe.





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