IBM establishing new innovation centre in Copenhagen

250 skilled IT talents being brought on as staff

The international tech company IBM is significantly expanding its portfolio in Denmark by creating a new innovation centre in Copenhagen.

READ MORE: Facebook eyeing data centre in Odense

Over the next two years, IBM will hire 250 skilled IT workers to staff the centre, which has been given the title ‘Client Innovation Center’. Invest in Denmark and Copenhagen Capacity will assist IBM in locating the staff.

“This is exactly the type of investment we wish to attract. The innovation centre will enhance the Greater Copenhagen ICT cluster and be an innovation lighthouse that could potentially attract other important players,” said Steen Hommel, the head of Invest in Denmark.

READ MORE: Danish innovation centre opening up in Tel Aviv

Beacon for the big boys
The foreign minister, Kristian Jensen, called the news one of the top business developments for Denmark. He expects the centre to further boost Denmark’s burgeoning position as a global IT leader.

“The government attaches a great deal of importance to making it attractive for foreign companies to invest in Denmark,” said Jensen.

READ MORE: Apple investing billions in Denmark

“So I am incredibly pleased that we can assist IBM in expanding into Copenhagen. It’s a fine example of Invest In Denmark’s targeted efforts to generate knowledge-based jobs in Denmark. I see IBM’s innovation centre as a beacon that can attract other important players within IT.”

The innovation centre is scheduled to open it doors on 1 January 2017.





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