Denmark stepping up fight against pirates in West Africa

Gulf of Guinea has struggled with piracy in recent years

The government has allocated 13.3 million kroner for a new EU program anchored in strengthening maritime security in the Gulf of Guinea off the coast of west Africa.

As part of the program, Denmark will also send a maritime advisor with a military background to the region, which faces considerable challenges in regards to piracy.

“It is very important to the economic development of west Africa that we assist in the improvement of maritime security in the Gulf of Guinea and support the nations in their ability to prosecute pirates,” said Kristian Jensen, the foreign minister.

“It is also very much in our own interests, because a huge part of west Africa’s trade is transported on Danish ships. And Danish companies have invested billions in harbour areas in the region. Fighting piracy, the economy of the nations and Danish interests are thus closely bound.”

READ MORE: Maersk ship attacked in Nigeria

Networking in Nigeria
The Danish advisor will be based in Abuja, Nigeria and will contribute to the building of local and regional capacities aimed at countering the threat of piracy, while also creating closer bonds between Denmark and the Nigerian defence.

Just earlier this year, a container ship belonging to the Danish shipping giant Maersk was attacked and briefly hijacked off the coast of Nigeria.





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