Vestas blowing off 350 jobs in Jutland

Production plant in Lem to see drastic staff reduction

Danish wind turbine producer Vestas has revealed it will be letting go 350 employees at its plant in Lem in west Jutland.

The company said in a press release that the move was necessary in order to strengthen its ability to compete. The redundancies, making up over a third of the total workforce in Lem, will take place at the end of this year.

“Our flexible and scalable production set-up is one of the primary elements in our current success, and it is a business strategy we will follow going forward,” said Jean-Marc Lechêne, the COO of Vestas.

“It’s never easy to say goodbye to good colleagues, but this is unfortunately a necessary step for Vestas to be highly competitive in a global market.”

READ MORE: Vestas revels in fantastic late September

Uncertain 2017
According to Vestas, it employs around 4,600 people in Denmark – 2,400 of which work in production. On a global scale, the company employs 21,900 people.

The news comes just eight days after the company revealed strong financial results for the first nine months of the year.

However, in the light of uncertainty in the industry in the wake of Donald Trump’s election in the US and growth concerns in 2017, shares have fallen by 15 percent since the release of the financial results.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.