Number of traffic fatalities on the rise in Denmark

Over 200 people were killed in car accidents in 2016

Traffic deaths in Denmark have increased to 208 this year compared to 178 fatalities in 2015, reports Politiken.

It is the first time since 2011 that the number of people killed in car accidents has exceeded 200 and a far cry from the government’s goal of a maximum of 120 annual traffic deaths by 2020.

READ MORE: Distracted drivers causing more traffic accidents in Denmark

Sign of better economy
Harry Lahrmann, a traffic researcher at Aalborg University, believes the higher number of traffic fatalities correlates with better economic situation in Denmark.

“We have seen before that [the numbers] start to rise when the economy is going well,” said Lahrmann.

“[Motorists] drive more kilometres, which increases the risk of accidents and more people get killed.”

READ MORE: Far fewer drink-driving accidents involving young Danes

Lower than in 2008
In 2008, annual traffic fatalities were above 400, but then the numbers began a steady decline.

In 2012, they were down to 167, the lowest number of traffic deaths since statistics began being collected in 1930.

However, in 2013 the numbers went back up to 191 and the year after to 182.





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