Valentine’s play: Danes number one in Europe at buying sex toys

With Sweden at number two, the survey taker questions whether the cold Scandinavian weather is to blame

Couples in Denmark should be having a fun and, well, playful Valentine’s Day.

A new study has revealed that Danes purchase more sex toys than residents of any other country in Europe. Lovers in Sweden and the UK were just a tickler behind the Danes when it comes to looking for a magic wand.

Research into the online habits of European shoppers revealed that Danes tend to search the most for sex toys – 118 times per 1,000 internet users per year. That’s more than one search for every ten residents in the country.

READ MORE: They love their sex toys in Randers

Sweden, the UK, the Netherlands and Russia completed the European top five. While apparently folks in Azerbaijan are not fun-seekers, with just 10 sex toy searches per 1,000 people.

Around the world, the US would narrowly edge out the UK for bedroom creativity, while Australia would creep into the European top 10.

Love eggs and jiggle balls
The research, conducted by Vouchercloud, took 18 of the most popular sex toy products and search terms from Lovehoney – including generic terms like ‘sex toys’ and ‘dildos’ and more niche but still popular products like ‘love eggs’ and ‘jiggle balls’ – and translated them into every Google-accepted language.

“A somewhat unique dataset has revealed some truly interesting findings concerning European love-making,” said Chris Johnson, the head of operations at Vouchercloud.

“We’re a little surprised the UK has offered an extremely strong showing, particularly given the heavily reserved English stereotypes. However, the Nordic nations have definitely put the rest of Europe to shame. There’s more than one way to deal with the cold, after all!”

(photo: Vouchercloud)




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