Jannik Hansen traded to the Sharks on deadline day

Canuck favourite teams up with fellow Danish ice hockey player Mikkel Bødker in San Jose

The Danish NHL player Jannik Hansen, 30, has been traded by the Vancouver Canucks to the San Jose Sharks.

The fans’ favourite, who spent ten years in the Canadian city, will join forces with fellow countryman Mikkel Bødker.

Hansen was part of a NHL deadline day trade that sent the 21-year-old Russian player Nikolay Goldobin, a fourth-round 2017 draft choice, to the Canadian club.

Vancouver said it was hard to let the Dane go.

“Jannik has been an important part of our team for more than a decade, and we want to thank him, his wife Karen and their children for everything they’ve done,” said Canucks general manager Jim Benning.

“We wish them all the best in San Jose.”

READ MORE: First Dane ever selected for NHL All-Star team

From the maple syrup to the coast
Hansen debuted for Vancouver during the playoffs in the 2006/2007 season after being drafted in 2004. He played 565 NHL games for the Canucks and amassed 235 points (105 goals and 130 assists). In Denmark, he played for the Rødovre Mighty Bulls.

Hansen’s new teammate Bødker joined the Sharks from the Colorado Avalanche before this season. Hansen will be moving to the United States from Canada, so there is some paperwork, including a visa and work permit, to be completed before he can make his debut in San Jose.





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