Netto’s UK failure hits Dansk Supermarket hard

Dansk Supermarked took a 200 million kroner loss, but still improved overall last year

Dansk Supermarked’s decision to close all of its Netto stores in the UK last year was a hefty bill to foot.

The decision cost the supermarket chain owner 200 million kroner, although it still ended 2016 with a 500 million increase in its turnover to 58 billion kroner.

Netto actually operated in the UK from 1990 to 2011, before returning again in 2014 as part of a co-operation with the British supermarket giant Sainsbury’s.

READ MORE: Netto weighs in to cut food waste

Digital dare
Dansk Supermarked has decided instead to focus its efforts on gaining more market share in Sweden and Poland, where more Netto shops are expected to open.

The supermarket chain has also indicated that it will attempt to solidify its presence in Denmark by embracing more digital initiatives and further invest in its physical shops.

Dansk Supermarked aims to become the leading online goods seller in Denmark, according to the chain’s CEO, Per Bank.

“Our financial strength makes it possible to hedge our bets on going digital, while still continuing to develop our products on offer and reduce prices to the benefit of our customers,” Bank told TV2 News.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.