New Danish political party wants to return to the roots of democracy via mobile app

Is it possible to eliminate spin and bring democracy back into the hands – literally – of the voters? Initiativet thinks it is

Initiativet, a new political party, wants to use modern smartphone technology to put voters back in the driving seat when it comes to lawmaking.

Initiativet intends to use its mandate according to how voters have indicated their preference via their platform. This will involve a mobile app that allows voting on individual law proposals as well as taking part in the general political debate.

READ ALSO: New party blasts election process

Mikkel Møller Andersen, Holger Thorup and Sebastian Winther are the trio behind Initiativet.

“We don’t think the general public are taken seriously enough in Danish politics. Politics is mostly about spin, scandals and cake, rather than serious political content,” explained Thorup.

It is already possible to get an idea of how the platform will function in practice on the party’s website (initiativet.net ). Everyone has the possibility of casting an anonymous vote using their NemID digital signature – even if you didn’t vote for Initiativet at an election.

“It is vitally important that everyone can see that the policies emanating from Parliament chime with opinions that exist in the voting base you have a mandate from. Our party can therefore become an asset to all parties, who will then be able to see which issues people are really concerned about,” contended Andersen.

“We are bringing people’s votes all the way into Parliament by letting everyone vote on all bills – and not just when there is a general election every four years,” added Thorup.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.