CPH Airport off to flying start in 2017

Passenger growth helps Nordic hub turn in strong profit for first quarter

A passenger increase of 2.3 percent during the first quarter of 2017 compared to the same quarter last year has helped CPH Airport push up revenue by 3.1 percent and secure profits of over 300 million kroner.

During the first quarter of the year, a total of 6,243,782 passengers passed though the airport, with growth being mainly driven by an increase in international passengers.

“Passenger growth in the first quarter was reasonably good and in line with our expectations,” said Thomas Woldbye, the CEO of CPH Airport.

“A major factor in passenger growth was the continued increase in the number of tourists visiting Denmark. More than 30 percent more tourists flew here during the first quarter, particularly young people on weekend trips, which is a growing segment.”

READ MORE: CPH Airport postpones axing runway following intense criticism

Expectations as is
Woldbye went on to explain that the airport’s recent expansion of intercontinental flights has been a significant boost to driving up passenger figures.

The airport also highlighted the launch of two new major expansion projects at the start of this year – a new pier E for larger aircraft and the expansion of the airport area immediately after the security checkpoints between piers A and B.

Despite the positive results, the airport will not adjust its expected profit margin for the year, which remains at 1-6-1.7 billion kroner before tax.





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