Danish merchant fleet growing despite rough financial seas

But the number of maritime jobs has dwindled due to challenging market conditions

According to a new report by the Danish Shipowners’ Association (DSA), there are more ships under the Danish flag sailing on the high seas this year.

The report found that Denmark’s shipping fleet consists of 683 ships in 2016 – an increase of 21 ships compared to the previous year.

“The development in the Danish trade fleet shows that it is attractive to set sail under a Danish flag,” said Anne H Steffensen, the head of DSA.

“We need to maintain that so Denmark can remain one of the world’s ten biggest maritime nations. A strong shipping business is key in the maritime cluster – ‘The Blue Denmark’ – which is the source of over 100,000 Danish jobs across the nation.”

READ MORE: Denmark and Japan hoist anchor on maritime and Olympic issues

Fewer jobs
But not all is smooth sailing. Due to the challenging market conditions in the maritime industry last year, the industry employed about 1,000 fewer people compared to 2015.

The decrease mainly affected foreign workers in the industry, with 833 losing their jobs. At the same time, 143 Danes were also forced to find other employment.

“It’s never good news when maritime employment decreases, but unfortunately it was expected due to the downturn year for the global shipping industry,” said Steffensen.

“However, we have seen an improvement in shipping export figures over the past two quarters and we hope that this will reflect positively.”





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.