Government slammed over broken climate agreement promises

The Venstre-led government is being criticised by Danish aid organisations for breaking promises made at the COP15 climate summit

At the UN’s 2009 climate change conference in Copenhagen , COP15, prime minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen and other world leaders promised to give 100 million ‘new and extra’ dollars to support climate measures worldwide.

However, a number of aid organisations such as Folkekirkens Nødhjælp, Care, Oxfam and Ibis maintain that the government has almost halved the amount of support being given to developing countries in climate support subsidies from 1.9 billion kroner to around 1 billion, Politiken reports.

READ ALSO: Danish climate-tech aid unveiled at COP22

All mixed up
“Denmark promised to give ‘more, new and extra money’ in climate support subsidies but along the way, this has combined with development aid, which has been reduced,” Sarah Kristine Johansen, political co-ordinator of Care Danmark said.

Development minister Ulla Tørnæs does not dispute the figures but rejects the criticism.

“If you count private investment in climate adaptation, Denmark contributes a combined amount of 2.4 billion kroner. That is a substantial sum that we have good reason to be proud of,” the minister said.





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