Danes beat Czechs to end Euro 2017 on positive note

An exciting match saw Denmark win 4-2 and avoid last place in Group C

In what must surely be one of the most entertaining matches so far Euro 2017 for under-21s, Denmark beat Czech Republic 4-2 in Krakow to avoid finishing last in Group C.

With a Czech side needing to win and win big to have any hope of finishing as the best second-placed team, and a Denmark side already eliminated and playing offensively, goals were bound to come. And they did, by the buckets loads.

Lucas Andersen scored Denmark’s first goal of the tournament after 23 minutes, a lead that was short-lived with the Czechs equalising four minutes later.

Bruising striker Kenneth Zohore got his first start of the tournament, and perhaps the coach, Niels Frederiksen will be left wishing he had played him more as the put the Danes ahead once more after 35 minutes following a clinical break. Zohore had also assisted Andersen’s earlier strike.

READ MORE: Verdammt! Germans snuff out Danish Euro dreams

Czeching out in style
But the Czechs would go away and drew level once more ten minutes after the break through a towering header by giant 199cm substitute Tomáš Chorý.

The Czech pressed hard to get more goals and Denmark took full advantage of the gaps being left behind in the defence and midfield as Zohore struck once again with just under 20 minutes to go.

The goal deflated the Czechs and while Jeppe Højbjerg had some tidy saves to maintain Denmark’s lead, the Danes seemed in control. See the match highlights here.

A last-minute strike by Marcus Ingvartsen (assisted again by Zohore) sealed the victory, which put the Danes ahead of the Czechs in the standing by virtue of head-to-head.

Italy beat Germany 1-0 in the other group match to win the group on head-to-head as well and they face Spain in the semis, which the Germans take on England.





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