Justice Minister fights back with new package of anti-gang measures

The recent spate of gang-related shootings in Copenhagen and other towns has sparked a sharp response from the government

The justice minister, Søren Pape Poulsen, is an angry man. At a press conference this afternoon to present the latest anti-gang measures, the minister called the situation “grotesque” and admitted that he was “furious”, according to DR Nyheder.

Poulsen revealed a package consisting of 12 new initiatives designed to stop the gang war that has been raging on the streets of Copenhagen for the past few weeks. There were three shootings recorded only last night.

READ ALSO: Government looking to ban gang in wake of recent violence

Increasing pressure on criminals
“The large number of shooting incidents show that the situation is extremely serious. Both as a citizen and as justice minister I must emphasise that we will use all the methods at our disposal to increase the already massive pressure on gangs,” Poulsen told DR Nyheder.

Among other things, the police will employ around 25 computer specialists, all experts in following digital clues.

About the same number of people will be engaged in preventative work in areas judged to be specially at risk. The aim is to stop young people being recruited by gangs in the first place.

Another proposal would make it mandatory for people who wish to wear a bulletproof vest to register it with the police.

Freeing up more manpower
In addition, the military will take over some of the tasks that the police perform at present regarding border controls, thus freeing up police manpower for anti-gang measures.

The minister emphasised that the new measures should be seen as a continuation of the ones already in place.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.