Media interest in suspicious submarine ‘death’ intensifies as Øresund sighting is confirmed

News outlets speculate that sub was deliberately sunk and that the police must have had strong evidence to press charges so early

Peter Madsen’s submarine, the Nautilus, was sighted just north of the Øresund Bridge near the island of Saltholm in the early hours of Friday morning, it has emerged.

READ MORE: Danish submarine owner accused of causing Swedish journalist’s death

Madsen has been charged with ‘uagtsomt manddrab’ – negligent manslaughter – in connection with the death of a Swedish journalist who joined him onboard at 19:30 on Thursday evening. However, no body has been found.

Strong evidence?
As media interest in the story spiralled over the weekend, news outlets have reported that Madsen is suspected of deliberately scuttling his vessel around Friday lunchtime in waters near Køge south of Copenhagen – possibly to destroy evidence.

However, a Swedish crime expert has told media that the police would not have been so quick to charge Madsen had they not found serious evidence to suggest he caused her death.

Sound evidence
The sighting on Friday morning would appear to suggest Madsen entered Swedish waters. And as speculation mounts that the body of Swedish journalist Kim Wall may have ended up in the sea, it widens the search area even more.

According to those onboard a cargo ship that came within 30 metres of colliding with Madsen, the sub had no lights on – unusual in a body of water that is as busy as the Øresund.

Not one of Putin’s
“We very nearly collided,” an un-named witness told Swedish newspaper Aftonbladet.

“It was completely dark, and I saw it only because of the moonlight. Initially I thought it might be a Putin spy submarine.”





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