Young workers in Denmark feeling under pressure

Nearly every fifth worker under 35 often stressed

According to a massive new survey conducted by Magasinet Arbejdsmiljø, close to 20 percent of all workers in Denmark under the age of 35 often or always feel stressed at work.

The survey ’Arbejdsmiljø og Helbred i Danmark 2016’ (‘Work Environment and Health in Denmark 2016’) interviewed 35,000 workers across the nation.

“For many, they are in their first job or at the start of their working life. That can mean there is a risk of a lack of balance between the demands of their workplace and the resources at their disposal,” Malene Friis Andersen, a researcher at the National Research Centre for the Working Environment, said according to TV2 News.

“Additionally, many are at the point in their lives when they start families and challenges can emerge in connection with balancing their private and working life during a busy and hectic daily grind.”

READ MORE: Every second Dane works when they are on holiday

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While almost every fifth working Dane aged 18-34 said they always or often felt stressed, the average across all age groups showed that almost every seventh felt the same.

According to Andersen, this is a good indicator for companies that they need to look into how they take on newly-educated workers to see how they can help them ease the pressure.

“They need to ensure that they get the needed support from colleagues and leaders as social support is the most important element when it comes to preventing stress,” said Andersen.

“The earlier in life you experience a psychological heath problem, the greater the risk that you get one later in life. So it’s really important that they help that group.”





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