Business News in Brief: Danish inflation rate spikes during tourist peak season

In other news, TDC numbers are falling and Joe & The Juice is heading for the Windy City

The Danish inflation rate hit a five-year high of 1.5 percent in July – up from 0.4 percent in the same month last year – according to a report in the Financial Times. The July surge was driven by a sharp 4.1 percent rise in food and drink prices during the tourist peak season, along with a 3.6 percent jump in the cost of restaurants and hotels, pushing Denmark’s consumer price index above its eurozone peers for the first time since June 2016. The inflation rate is at its highest rate since December 2012.

Numbers down at TDC
Telecoms company TDC suffered a bad second quarter of the year, losing customers across the board. In total, 10,000 customers unsubscribed to its mobile phone services, of which 80 percent were in the business sector. And it also lost 23,000 household television subscribers – partly due to a lost deal with a major housing association that accounted for 8,000. In related news, TDC has been accused of ‘washing its hands’ of a problem by cancelling its contract with a Serbian company hired to upgrade the YouSee network. The firing left the company’s Serbian employees, who had relocated to Denmark to work, in limbo. TDC said it made its decision out of concern for the employees, who were being made to work up to 80 hours a week.

Joe’s in Chicago now
The Danish juice and coffee bar chain Joe & The Juice has signed three leases in central Chicago – its first Chicago and Midwest locations. The three outlets will be based at 10 East Delaware, 412 North Wells Street and 8 East Huron and open in either 2017 or 2018.





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