Denmark boosts efforts to protect religious minorities

Meanwhile, another two hate preachers added to Danish ban list

The government has unveiled plans to set aside millions of kroner in funding on the 2018 budget in order to better protect religious minorities.

The news came today as the foreign minister, Anders Samuelsen, and development minister, Ulla Tørnæs, hosted a debate meeting with a number of faith-based organisations, experts and politicians.

“Christians and other religious minorities are under duress in many parts of the world – not least the Middle East and north Africa. Strengthening the international co-operation for the protection of Christian minorities is a priority of the government,” said Samuelsen.

“We must work to promote religious freedom in the world, as conveyed by the government’s foreign and security strategy. Everyone should freely be able to practice their religion without fearing persecution or discrimination.”

READ MORE: Denmark reveals first blacklist for hate preachers

Hate preachers banned
In related news, the Danish government has decided to add another two names to the list of hate preachers banned from entering Denmark.

The two are Alparsian Kuytul, the leader of the Furkan movement in Turkey, and Ismail al-Wahwah from Australia.

“Hate preachers are puppets of evil and too often we have seen how they recruit and incite hate and terror. We shouldn’t give these hate preachers any platform from which to influence our nation,” said the integration minister, Inger Støjberg.





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