Rape and offences involving violence up, but crime rates in Denmark generally falling

While break-ins have fallen over the first half of 2017, the economic crime rate has jumped by more than 15 percent

The Danish police have had to deal with fewer break-ins at private houses during the first half of the year, but there has been an increase in the number of rapes reported.

All in all, 2,270 sexual offences were reported and this shows an increase of 12.4 percent compared to the same period last year, DR Nyheder reports. Of these, 456 were rapes, which is a 4 percent increase compared to last year.

One reason for the rise in the violent crime statistics is an increase in threats to public servants carrying out their duties. Under the heading of violent crime, 9,418 were reported, an increase of 9.4 percent, but not very many of them were for serious violence.

Cybercrime on the rise
Economic crime, however, is again on the rise – this time by 15.6 percent. Here, data theft and fraud are largely responsible for the statistics.

On the positive side, there were 2,100 fewer break-ins in private houses and burglaries have decreased by almost 12 percent compared with last year.

Still a safe place, though
The police also emphasise that despite these statistics, punishable crime in Denmark is at its third-lowest level for 11 years.





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