Copenhagen artists invite public to tour their unique space

Art collective hidden in plain sight in the heart of the city

A group of professional artists working in a unique space in central Copenhagen are opening up their hideaway to the public this week.

Tucked under the loft of the old Rudoph Bergh Hospital, a mere stone’s throw from Tivoli and Copenhagen’s central train station, 22 professional artists are exploring their creativity in over 500 sqm of studio space. The collective’s central location is unique, given that urban development and price hikes in Copenhagen has driven many artists to seek studios on the outskirts of the city. 

The artists range from painters and photographers to writers and sound artists. Among them, Meik Brusch makes intricate, wooden sculptures in all shapes and sizes. Jacoba Niepoort creates 30-metre paintings on boards and small drawings on paper. Sertan Saltan works in a realistic portrait style. And many more creative people bring their visions to life.

Have a peek … and a drink!
This Friday and Saturday, November 17 and 18, the collective are opening their doors to the public. On view will be an annual group exhibition, as well as a chance to explore the space’s unique architecture and many studio rooms with a glass of gløgg in hand.

Everyone is welcome and the event (located at Tietgensgade 31C, 3 sal, Cph V) is free. It is open from 16:00 until 20:00 on Friday November 17 and from 13:00 until 17:00 on Saturday November 18.





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