Police finds final limb connected to submarine case

All of journalist Kim Wall’s body parts have now been found

Copenhagen Police has found another arm in connection with the submarine case involving the death and dismemberment of Swedish journalist Kim Wall.

The arm, which was the final missing limb belonging to Wall to be recovered, was located by police yesterday in Køge Bay near Copenhagen.

“The arm has yet to be examined, but it has been found in the same area that we found the first arm, and it had been weighed down in a similar manner,” said Jens Møller Jensen, the chief investigator at Copenhagen Police.

“Therefore, we assume the arm is connected to the submarine case.”

READ MORE: Severed arm found in sea off Copenhagen could be Kim Wall’s, say police

Searching for phones
Jensen also said that finding the last missing limb would hopefully offer some solace to Kim Wall’s next of kin as they now have a complete body to bury.

The police found Wall’s other arm last week, while her severed head and legs have also been recovered, as well as her torso.

Submarine builder and amateur rocketry enthusiast Peter Madsen remains in custody. He has been charged with killing Wall while taking her for a trip on the submarine on August 10.

Police divers will continue to search the area for Wall and Madsen’s mobile phones.





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