New phone app developed to help diabetes-sufferers live a more healthy life

If you are a diabetic with type-2 diabetes, personal contact an advisor to get help on making the right choices to optimise your health

A new free app called LIVA has been made available by Copenhagen’s Center for Diabetes to make things easier for diabetics in their daily lives.

READ ALSO: Copenhagen Municipality to fight diabetes in capital region

The app has been developed in Denmark by the team behind NetDoktor, SlankeDoktor and Sundheds Doktor and is specially designed to suit Danish conditions. With Copenhagen now taking it up, the number of municipalities using the app around the country has grown to 12.

Setting and maintaining goals
The app allows you to code in the goals that you wish to achieve when it comes to things like food, exercise, blood sugar level, amount of sleep, blood pressure and cholesterol, and LIVA will then keep an eye on them and follow your progress. Some of the data is compiled from other apps on your phone, while other things have to be entered by the user.

The centre will then monitor your progress and you will be able to enter into a dialogue with an advisor through either text messages or video when it suits you. This could prove a boon to anyone who has type-2 diabetes but is unable to regularly visit the centre in Vesterbro.

Your own personal advisor
“The special thing about LIVA compared to other health apps is that you have a personal advisor who keeps an eye on your progress and continually motivates you to reach your goals,” said the head of the centre, Charlotte Glümer.

“This increases the possibility that you can achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle,” she added.

Anyone interested can sign up for the app here.





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