Concert Review: Romantic expression at its very best

★★★★★☆

Many came to witness a musical feast on January 20 at DR Koncerthuset. The soloist of the day was Swedish-born master of the trumpet Håkan Hardenberger.

The classics with a modern twist
The orchestra performed Robert Schumann’s Manfred Overture op. 115, Bernd Alois Zimmerman’s Nobody knows de trouble I see, and Symphony no 1, op. 68 by Johannes Brahms.

Whilst music of Schumann and Brahms offered a rich, structured and melodic experience, Zimmerman’s concerto for trumpet and orchestra impressed with complicated phrasings and jazzy rhythms. In it was a place for the soloist to shine, and Hardenberger performed his parts to a note with skilful precision.

The symphonic mastermind
The main course of the day was Brahms’ first symphony. Like his predecessor and master Beethoven, Brahms fashioned his first symphonic work with memorable melodies and explosive conclusions. Especially in the last movement, the true power of the orchestra was felt.

As it is with music of this kind, the trick is not to expect anything. One should just allow one’s ear to absorb the richness of colours, rhythms and themes. Especially in the case of Brahms’ symphonies, such attitude guarantees a rewarding listening experience.

Strength and vigour
Under the direction of the Finnish conductor, the orchestra sounded loud and powerful. Throughout the pieces, a heavy emphais on the brass and woodwind sections could be heard.

The conductor made sure that the audience felt the impact of the mighty brass section. The effect was strengthened by the superb acoustics of the concert hall. All tones, from soft to loud, were clear and satisfying.

Just listen
It was yet another great day at DR Koncerthuset. The program offered an enjoyable mix of musical styles.

If you like your music rich and moving, you should definitely check out the concerts at DR Koncerthuset. You will not be disappointed. See you there!

 

 





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