Stena Lines refitting ferry to run on batteries

The ferry Jutlandica that sails between Frederikshavn and Gothenburg is being used as an experiment in green technology

Emission reductions has become an important issue for shipping companies. The Danish company Stena Lines has plans to convert one of its ferries so that it will eventually be able to sail on battery power alone.

However, although the ferry is going in for a refit in the summer of 2018, it will only be a hybrid to start with, having both battery and diesel power, reports Ingeniøren.

One step at a time
According to the company, running the ship on battery propulsion alone is only expected to be feasible by around 2030.

Over the course of the summer refit, a 1 MWh battery will be installed. In order to sail the estimated 50 nautical miles from Frederikshavn in Denmark to Gothenburg in Sweden, a battery with a capacity of 50 MWh is required.

When in port, the ferry will be charged at an automatic charging station but with manual coupling to the ship.

“Recharging will be carried out using the systems available at present. We will use existing high voltage shore connections. The ship will be able to charge up around 500 kWh each time she is in port,” explained Stena Line’s press officer, Jesper Waltersson

A very interesting option
“As both the size and price of batteries are falling, this type of power is going to become a very interesting alternative to traditional fuel in the transport sector. It could mean a complete elimination of emissions being released into the atmosphere,” added Waltersson.

The batteries have been ordered by the Callenberg Technology Group, and the project is being supported by both the EU and the Swedish maritime administration.





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