Government launches new strategy for economic diplomacy

Bid aims to increase exports and attract more investment to Denmark

The government aims to boost growth and employment in Denmark by unveiling a new strategy for economic diplomacy.

The strategy hangs its hat on increasing exports and attracting foreign investment into Denmark, as well as tackling the challenges associated with protectionist trends that are emerging in the world today.

“We can’t underline enough how important it is for the government to help Danish companies break down barriers around the world and gain access to new markets,” said the foreign minister, Anders Samuelsen.

“We do that via an active trade policy in which we work for new free trade deals through the EU and a stronger co-operation with local authorities in specific growth markets. We also work towards getting more growth companies into the export markets.”

READ MORE: Danish exports on the slide as neighbours lose interest

Good sustainable business
The development minister, Ulla Tørnæs, added that the mobilisation of investment and solutions was imperative to reaching the UN 2030 goals for ridding the world of poverty and tackling climate issues.

She contended that Danish companies need to realise that making a difference is good business and that it is important to help develop markets in developing countries.

“The future for Africa’s youth is not in Europe. It’s created through economic development in countries like Ghana, Kenya and Nigeria. We have strong networks in the countries and internationally. And we use them actively to promote Danish solutions in new markets,” said Tørnæs.

Read more about the strategy here (in Danish).





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