Historic space capsule ‘touches down’ in Denmark

Andreas Mogensen’s iconic vessel obtained from Russia by Danish Museum of Science & Technology

On 2 September 2015, Andreas Mogensen made history when he became the first Dane to fly in space as part of the ‘iriss programme’.

Now, Mogensen’s feat will soon be on display following the news that the Danish Museum of Science & Technology (DTM) has acquired the space capsule ‘Soyuz TMA-18M’ that he was in when he was thrusted into space for his 10-day space odyssey.

“It’s a huge scoop for DTM that they’ve managed to secure Andreas Mogensen’s space capsule, which is clear evidence that Denmark is a space nation,” said the culture minister, Mette Boch.

“Some museum articles are more unique than others, and this is a real piece of Danish history. I hope it will stir Danish interest in technology and science to even greater lengths and attract even more visitors to the museum.”

READ MORE: Andreas becomes the first Dane in space

A princely debut
The Soyuz TMA-18M craft ’touched down’ in Denmark yesterday following over two years of clandestine negotiations with the Russian authorities – and with assistance of the Danish embassy in Russia.

The capsule will be officially put on display on May 8 at 11:00 in a ceremony that will be attended by Mogensen himself, Boch and Prince Joachim

Securing the capsule was also made possible thanks to financial support from the Aage and Johanne Louis-Hansens Foundation.





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