Denmark inks historic agreement with the World Economic Forum

Unique partnership aimed at embracing the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’

Denmark has become the first country in Europe to sign a partnership with the World Economic Forum (WEF) to meet the challenges of the Fourth Industrial Revolution – the fourth major industrial era since the initial Industrial Revolution of the 18th century.

The partnership, which is to be signed today in San Francisco by Denmark’s tech ambassador, Casper Klynge, is a concrete result of Denmark’s new TechPlomacy efforts and the government’s ambition to boost the digital transition in Denmark.

“Our mission is to shape the Fourth Industrial Revolution so that it benefits society. Denmark is committed to being a leader and piloting innovative frameworks and policies co-designed at the centre. We look forward to a strong collaboration and sharing findings throughout our network,” said Murat Sonmez, the head of the World Economic Forum Center for the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

READ MORE: New digital plan to improve conditions for running a business

Digital dawn
The partnership will help forge co-operation between private and public actors and focus on four specific arenas: Internet of Things, Life science and precision medicine, Ecosystems for digital innovation, and New approaches to regulation.

Part of the agreement entails looking into how to achieve the right balance between utilising technological potential to a maximum level and adequately protecting personal data.

“This partnership is based on a fundamental belief that technology in general will be a positive game-changer for the world. Like previous industrial revolutions, our time and age will grow the economy, lift people out of poverty, deliver unprecedented healthcare, develop sustainability across the board and build a new generation of startups,” said the foreign minister, Anders Samuelsen.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.