Danish government makes major investment in African wind energy

Project aimed at helping all Ethiopians gain access to electricity

The Danish government has committed 600 million kroner to the development of wind energy in Africa.

Ulla Tørnæs, Minister for Development Cooperation, approved the deal for the construction of a wind farm up to 54 turbines, or 100 MW, close to Ethiopia’s capital Addis Ababa. Total investment in the wind farm amounts to 1.26 billion kroner,  600 million of which comes from  Danida Business Finance.

The project will be tendered among Danish companies.

“The private sector’s involvement is crucial for development projects in Africa to be sustainable in the long term,” said Ulla Tørnæs. 

Improving access
The wind farm will be able to deliver sustainable power to more than a hundred thousand households in a country where less than one third have access to electricity. Ethiopia is one of the world’s poorest countries, and it suffers frequent and widespread drought. Hydropower plants dominate the power supply, which makes production difficult during periods of water shortages.

READ MORE: Denmark looking to double its energy tech exports

Ethiopia’s goal is for everyone in the country to have access to electricity by 2025.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.