Out & About: When it comes to maritime pollution, we need to be oceans together!

Last week on Friday marked the celebration of World Oceans Day, an occasion to reflect on the state of the world’s oceans.

In Denmark, every year over 1,000 tonnes of plastic wash up on the coast of the Northern Sea. As a result, Copenhagen International School held its own commemoration of the event on Tuesday evening, which was organised by CIS students Anna Zaske and Leonie Wechsler.

The two wished to encourage their peers to reflect on their own plastic consumption and how this affects their immediate environment. The event was intended to stress the effects plastic has on our waters and to teach the younger children about the importance of contributing to a healthy ocean.

The message from Zaske and Wechsler was simple: “we all share one ocean and thus as the generation of today, it becomes our responsibility to take our own future in our hands and protect our oceans for the future.”

The school welcomed guest speakers to help drive the message forward, including Melati and Isabel Wijsen, two young girls from Bali who founded the Bye Bye Plastic Bags organisation and have spoken at the UN General Assembly.

“We may be only 25 percent of the population, but we are 100 percent of the future,” they said.

Also speaking were Danish organisation Plastic Change and jewellery company Akva, whose work is inspired by oceans.

The event also featured an art exhibition featuring works made from plastic created by the school’s students. Daniel D’Andrea, CIS’s leader of Roots and Shoots, summarised the day’s event by saying ‘think globally, act locally’.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.