Denmark leads world in commitment to reducing inequality

Danes top 2018 Commitment to Reducing Inequality Index despite recent setbacks

According to the latest 2018 Commitment to Reducing Inequality Index (CRI Index) few countries can compete with Denmark when it comes to committing to reduce inequality.

Denmark finished top of the Oxfam-published index thanks to ranking fifth in the ‘Spending’ subcategory, and second in the ‘Taxation’ and ‘Labour Rights and Wages’ subcategories.

“Denmark tops this year’s CRI Index with the highest score. The northern European country has some of the most progressive taxation policies in the world. It also has some of the best labour market policies, and its protection of women in the workplace is the best in the world,” the index report found.

READ MORE: Denmark’s wealth inequality gap continues to widen

Decade of decline
Yet, the index report (here in English) also conveyed that reforms over the past 15 years have led to a 20 percent increase in inequality between 2005 and 2015.

Germany came in second, followed by Finland, Austria and Norway, while Belgium, Sweden, France, Iceland and Luxembourg rounded out the top 10.

Other notables included Japan (11), Australia (13), the UK (14), Canada (18), the US (23), Brazil (39), Russia (50), South Korea (56), China (81) and India (147).

Meanwhile, Nigeria was unfortunate enough to finish last, preceded by Uzbekistan, Haiti, Chad and Sierra Leone.





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