Denmark criticised by Amnesty International for failing rape victims

The organisation claims that women encounter many barriers in their quest for justice

Despite a recent report from the World Bank, which ranks Denmark as one of the world’s leading countries for gender equality in the labour market, Amnesty International states that there are further issues that needs to be addressed in the arena, reports BT.

According to a new report from the organisation, at least 5,000 women are raped in Denmark annually, but less than 1,000 file the case with the police, and only 100 leads to a conviction.

“Denmark has an alarmingly high rate of impunity when it comes to sexual violence and an out-dated legislation that does not meet international standards,” Kumi Naidoo, the secretary general of Amnesty International, told the tabloid.

Call for change in legislation
Amnesty International urges the Danish authorities to change the legal definition of rape and to improve the treatment of victims through the legal process.

Clara Alger, the European manager of Amnesty International, is surprised that Denmark has such a low number of convictions when it comes to sexual violence, and she recommends specific steps that should be taken.

She contends that even though the Danish state signed an international convention meant to protect victims of sexual violence through consent-based legislation, it is not evident in the current law of the country.

“If Denmark could make sexual consent a part of their legislation, it would be a great first step in the right direction,” pointed out Alger.

Danish politicians have not responded to the recent critique from the organisation, but sexual consent has been and still is being widely debated.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.