Power to the parents! Calling out the government on overcrowded, understaffed daycare centres

Mark Saturday April 6 in your diary as a date to make your voices heard about an acute problem across Denmark

Copenhagen has a problem with its population demographic – and for once it isn’t the eternal issue concerning the elderly becoming more … eternal.

Last month, it was reported how more families are choosing to stay in the capital, thus making Copenhagen’s schools over-crowded at a time when establishments in the regions are being shut down in droves.

And the same is true of daycare. In fact, their tendency to be overcrowded and understaffed is an issue that has become so acute that thousands will be protesting this Saturday at 13:00 in 53 towns and cities across Denmark.

Check out the details of your nearest demonstration here.

No longer the 1980s
The ‘Demonstration for minimumsnormeringer’ protesters are alarmed how the ratio of children per caregiver ratio has soared over the last 40 years to a level that is no longer responsible.

According to BUPL, the national association of children and youth teachers, 4,000 more caregivers need to be employed to address a 58 percent increase since the 1980s.

The situation prompted the national broadcast DR to make a documentary called ‘Hvem passer vores børn’ (who watches/cares for our children), which was broadcast in mid-March.

And then days later, Parliament rejected a proposal to discuss the possibility of introducing a minimum level of caregivers per child.

Avoiding the parents
But according to the concerned parents who are organising the April 6 protests, the government isn’t taking the concern seriously.

Sources close to the parents reveal that some of them feel that the relevant minister, Mai Mercardo, conveniently fell ill before a meeting with some of them over the weekend, and that she is ducking out of a chance to again meet them tomorrow on TV2.

Via social media – the Facebook page already has 25,710 members – the #hvorerderenvoksen (where is there an adult) grassroots campaign is gathering momentum ahead of Saturday’s marches as more people cite the movement.





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