Restaurant keen to implement innovative coronavirus measures to make guests feel safe

Visitors will be encouraged to register before dining

Following the suggestions of the health minister, Magnus Heunicke, a US-style restaurant chain wants to encourage guests to voluntarily leave their contact information in case there is reason to believe they could have been infected by the coronavirus.

Bone’s has 25 restaurants spread across Denmark and it wants to extend its internal safety measures at all of them, even though special coronavirus restrictions have only been implemented in 18 municipalities – most of which are in Greater Copenhagen.

However, it has not yet finalised a registration system.

A system that works
Registration cannot be carried out by simply putting a name down on a piece of paper. Customer data needs to be protected from any potential misconduct.

Bone’s envisages a special data collection system to keep track of their guests, which will be designed in full compliance with Danish and European data protection laws.

A Bone’s IT team is working on putting an intuitive and secure system in place.

Why us, again?!
Jan Vinther Laursen, the CEO of Bone’s, does not think the restaurant industry is contributing to the recent rise in infection cases, but he wants to be proactive.

“We did not think that our part of the industry would come into focus again,” he told DR.

“I do not think it is in the restaurant environment where the infection is spreading. But if it provides an extra degree of security for our guests, we are happy to play along.”

 

 

 

 

 





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