Police in nationwide speeding crackdown this week

The vast majority of fatal accidents on Danish roads involve speeds that are less than 20 km/h above permitted limits

From September 21-27, the police will be on the lookout for speed demons on roads across the country.

High speed is often a key aspect of traffic accidents – 62 percent of fatal accidents involve speeds of less than 20 km/h above permitted limits.

“Every year the police are called out to untold numbers of traffic accidents that could have been avoided if those involved had adhered to speed limits,” said Christian Berthelsen, a spokesperson for the state police traffic centre. 

“Even just exceeding the speed limit a little bit can have great implications for braking distances.”

READ ALSO: Government wants to make helmets mandatory for electric scooters

Speed kills
There is a clear link between speeding and the number of people injured and killed in traffic – high speed is the most common reason for accidents leading to serious injury or death.

Between 2013 and 2018, 403 people died in traffic accidents in which at least one of the involved parties was driving too fast in terms of the speed limit or the road conditions.

And in 72 percent of the accidents, speed was a deciding factor in the accident occurring. 





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.