Expect restrictions this Christmas, says PM

The government has warned that coronavirus restrictions will impact Xmas, though no plans for new regulations are currently in place

It seems unavoidable that national restrictions to prevent the spread of the coronavirus will come to impact Christmas and, live last night on Facebook, the prime minister confirmed that Christmas will be different this year.

“I think it’s been clear to everyone for a while that we won’t be celebrating Christmas this year quite like we usually do,” said Mette Frederiksen.

“We will have to observe social distancing, watch out for one another, and keep on making sure that we don’t meet with too many people.”

No clear Christmas strategy as of yet
Current guidelines mean that there is a limit on gatherings of more than 10 people, indoors and out. Everyone is strongly encouraged to work from home, where possible, and masks are mandatory on public transport and inside public buildings such as supermarkets.

However, it is not clear whether these restrictions will remain in place all the way through December – and currently, there is no decided plan on what Christmas guidance may look like.

“We cannot see so far into the future. There’s still a month to go until Christmas Eve, and the situation we’re facing in this epidemic may well change during that time,” said the PM.

“We will have to get closer to Christmas before we can speak more precisely about what rules will be in place.”





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